Glaucoma news

  • Eye health sector launches new SAFE approach to assist in improving the systems around the delivery of eye health and sight loss services in England

    PRESS RELEASE
    10 April 2018

    The Clinical Council for Eye Health Commissioning (CCEHC), which represents the leading clinical professions and sight loss charity organisations in the eye-care sector, has launched a new Systems and Assurance Framework for Eye-health (SAFE)1.

    Increasing demands on eye health services due to the ageing population and the availability of new treatments continue to create capacity issues within the hospital eye service as well as pressures on general practice and social care. SAFE provides a sustainable, consistent and coordinated approach to delivering efficient eye health and sight loss pathways.

    SAFE is aimed at those involved in eye health and sight loss services: Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and local authority commissioners, Local Eye Health Networks and providers across health and social care.

    SAFE is a series of core constructs and technical tools based on four principles:

    1. System-based approach to the planning, commissioning and provision of services, to improve patient flows and patient experience, which is operable at the level of an Integrated Care System (ICS) or Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STP) level.
    2. Assurance in delivering better outcomes for patients, and reduce duplication and waste of resources for the NHS
    3. Framework that provides consistency in the approaches taken to improve access, availability and integration of services taking into account the full range and complexity of care pathways that increasingly involve multiple providers and settings to deliver services across health and social care
    4. Eye-health conditions covered are the main adult chronic (Glaucoma and Age-related Macular Degeneration) and high-volume conditions (Cataract), but can be applied to any eye condition.

    Launching the new framework Parul Desai, Chair of the Clinical Council said:

    “The development of SAFE has been clinically led and clinically driven to ensure safe and effective services are available to meet individual and population eye health needs. This cross-sector initiative provides the basis for the organisation and delivery of pathways of care that patients can reasonably expect wherever they may live, with processes that provide assurance on quality and governance.”

    References:
    1. SAFE – System and Assurance Framework for Eye-health. 2018. Clinical Council for Eye Health Commissioning. www.ccehc.org.uk

    ENDS

    For media enquiries please contact: Ann-Marie Stevens, PR Manager, telephone: 020 7766 4342, email: annmarie.stevens@college-optometrists.org

    Notes to editors

    The Clinical Council for Eye Health Commissioning (CCEHC) represents the leading clinical professions and charity organisations in the eye-care sector. It is an independent advisory body providing evidence-based national clinical leadership, advice and guidance to policy makers in health, social care and public health, and those commissioning and providing eye health services in England. It is recognised as such through a Memorandum of Understanding with NHS England.
    Its member organisations are:
    • The Royal College of Ophthalmologists
    • The College of Optometrists
    • Association of Directors of Adult Social Services
    • Association of British Dispensing Opticians
    • British and Irish Orthoptic Society
    • Faculty of Public Health
    • Optical Confederation (including the Local Optical Committee Support Unit)
    • Royal College of General Practitioners
    • Royal College of Nursing (Ophthalmic nursing forum)
    • Royal National Institute of Blind People
    • International Glaucoma Association
    • Macular Society
    • Vision UK

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  • Fight for Sight announces 13 new awards to fund vital eye research

    Fight for Sight partners with nine different organisations to fund impactful and innovative research

    Fight for Sight, the leading eye research charity, has awarded grants totalling over £180,000 for thirteen vital research projects in partnership with nine different organisations. Fight for Sight has doubled its partnership working from the previous year, to further extend their impact and support for innovative research.

    New funds have been awarded to support research in these key areas:

    Dementia and visual impairment:
    For the first time, Fight for Sight and Alzheimer’s Research UK have teamed up to fund research into sight loss and dementia as many people with neurodegenerative diseases have problems with their vision. Pearse Keane from UCL’s Institute of Ophthalmology will aim to detect Alzheimer’s disease through images of the retina. Working with researchers from Moorfields, who will analyse a database of over 2 million eye scans, the team will identify features in the scans which are commAon to people who have developed a neurodegenerative disease. The longer term aim is to develop a screening tool for earlier detection of Alzheimer’s disease. The research will also enable a better understanding of why people with neurodegenerative diseases have problems with their vision.

    Dementia and age-related macular degeneration (AMD):
    Fight for Sight and Alzheimer’s Research UK are also jointly funding a project being led by Dr J. Arjuna Ratnayaka from the University of Southampton. Both Alzheimer’s disease and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been linked with a group of misfolded proteins called amyloid beta (Aβ). The aim of this research is to study how Aβ proteins in the vitreous, the substance that fills the centre of the eye, change with age and disease progression. The research team will collect vitreous samples from AMD patients, screen for changes in Aβ levels and compare the results to those from healthy individuals. This research could help further prove that changes to retinal Aβ levels may be an effective biomarker for high-risk individuals likely to develop AMD before the actual symptoms of sight loss occur.

    Birdshot uveitis:
    Fight for Sight is partnering with Birdshot Uveitis Society to fund Professor Alastair Denniston’s research into birdshot chorioretinopathy which is taking place at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust. The world’s first National Birdshot Biobank and Registry has been created, which is enabling researchers and clinicians to work towards better outcomes for birdshot treatments. Professor Denniston will study the genetic makeup of birdshot patients to understand the causes of the condition and develop ways to predict disease progression.

    Glaucoma:
    Fight for Sight and International Glaucoma Association are supporting a research project by Professor Colin Willoughby from Ulster University. Using the Treatment of Advance Glaucoma Study (TAGS), which has recruited over 450 patients, Professor Willoughby will explore the genetics of patients with advanced glaucoma. His team will provide predictive testing to improve early diagnosis. This will identify patients at risk of progression and may help to explain why the disease differs between different ethnic groups.

    Fight for Sight will also fund a project led by Dr Andrew Osbourne from the University of Cambridge, whose objective will be to improve our understanding of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in human retinal tissue. BDNF and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase-B (TrkB), help maintain the survival of retinal ganglion cells, which gradually die, leading to sight loss and eventually blindness. This research could help treat patients with progressive glaucoma, particularly those who receive treatment to lower intra-ocular eye pressure yet still experience deterioration of their vision.

    Retinal vascular disease:
    Fight for Sight in partnership with National Eye Research Centre is funding Dr Adam Dubis from Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust to create a database of normal eye blood flow features. This will define a range of healthy blood flow so that abnormal blood flow can be better identified. This information could result in improved diagnostic markers and potentially better treatments and patient management.

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy:
    Fight for Sight and Thomas Pocklington Trust are jointly funding Dr Patrick Yu Wai Man at the University of Cambridge. His research will make use of functional MRI to get high-resolution “real time” images of the visual pathways from the eye all the way back to the vision centres in the brain. Researchers will map out the chronological changes that occur along those pathways and in the brain after the onset of vision loss in individuals with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The researchers will explore whether functional MRI could prove useful as an assessment tool in future treatment trials. The knowledge gained will also help provide more accurate counselling to patients with LHON.

    Corneal and external eye conditions:
    Fight for Sight has funded Dr Mohammed Al-Aqaba from The University of Nottingham. A healthy ocular surface relies on stem cells replenishing old and damaged cells. The research team have discovered novel receptors which could play a pivotal role in the maintenance of this process. The aim of this research is to characterise the structure of these novel receptors which play a role in the regulation of stem cells and the micro-environment around the cornea. The results could reveal the function of these receptors and their role in the prevention of blindness.

    This latest round of Fight for Sight small grants also includes funding for the following projects:
    · Dr Maryse Bailly – funded in partnership with British Thyroid Foundation - A novel pathway regulating adipogenesis in Thyroid Eye Disease: characterization of spontaneous lipogenesis and validation of novel therapeutic targets
    · Dr Lee Mcilreavy – funded in partnership with Nystagmus Network - Diagnosing infantile nystagmus: a novel eye tracking approach
    · Dr Helen Griffiths – funded in partnership with Nystagmus Network - Nystagmus Stabilisation with Virtual Reality Technology
    · Dr Greg Elder – funded in partnership with Thomas Pocklington Trust and Esme’s Umbrella- Visual hallucinations in Charles Bonnet Syndrome: a neuroimaging comparison study with non-hallucinating control individuals
    · Miss Swan Kang – funded in partnership with Thyroid Eye Disease Charitable Trust - Characterisation of anterior segment vasculature in thyroid eye disease using optical coherence tomography angiography

    The next Fight for Sight small grants round opens for applications in May 2018 – keep an eye on the Fight for Sight web site for details: https://www.fightforsight.org.uk/apply-for-funding/

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