National Glaucoma Week, 4- 10 June 2018

Glaucoma and Dry Eye syndrome

To listen to Karen Osborn and volunteer, Gwyneth Evans-Patel, discuss dry eye and glaucoma, click here

Dry eye affects 50 to 60 per cent of people with glaucoma. If you suffer dry eye syndrome, you will know how debilitatinig dry eye can be and the impact that it can have on quality of life. It affects one in three people over the age of 65. Surprisingly many people do not know that they have the condition. We want to correct that with our campaign to run through The IGA National Glaucoma Awareness Week 2018 (4-10 June 2018).

Teary-eyed?

The impact of dry eye on people with glaucoma

#GetEyeWise

The International Glaucoma Association is focusing on the impact of dry eye syndrome for people with glaucoma during IGA National Glaucoma Week - 4 to 10 June 2018. Dry eye can have a debilitating effect on a person’s quality of life yet is little understood.

Dry eye syndrome affects 50 to 60 per cent of people with glaucoma and one in three people over the age of 65. It is a disorder where the eyes don’t make enough tears, or the tears evaporate too quickly. This can make eyes feel dry, scratchy and irritated or watery, and feel heavy and tired by the end of the day. In severe cases people report pain, discomfort and depression, and its impact has been compared with that of angina, dialysis and disabling hip fractures.

Commenting on the campaign, Karen Osborn says: “Dry eye has an adverse impact on quality of life, with people saying that they cannot read, find the sunlight painful, feel unhappy and can’t even open their eyes long enough to do certain daily tasks.”

“We want to encourage anyone who has aggravating dry eye symptoms to seek the advice of their optometrist, pharmacist or GP and it is important that people with glaucoma raise any dry eye symptoms with their ophthalmologist as a change of glaucoma treatment to a preservative free eye drop often helps to reduce the symptoms of dry eye syndrome”.

Glaucoma affects around 700,000 people in the UK and the majority of people will initially be treated with medical eye drops. Managing both dry eye and glaucoma effectively is important, but challenging. Both conditions are long-term but manageable.

Our leaflet contains lots more information:

Free Dry Eye Syndrome leaflet

About the International Glaucoma Association

The International Glaucoma Association (IGA) is the charity for people with glaucoma. Its mission is to raise awareness of glaucoma, promote research related to early diagnosis and treatment, and to provide support to patients and all those who care for them. For more information, please visit: www.glaucoma-association.com

Set up in 1974, it is the oldest patient based glaucoma association in the world and it is a registered charity in England and Wales, and also in Scotland.

As part of its support services, the IGA operates the Sightline (telephone helpline) and provides free information on any aspect of glaucoma.

For more information about glaucoma, contact the International Glaucoma Association (IGA) Sightline on 01233 64 81 70 (Monday to Friday, 9.30am–5.00pm)

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, close relatives of people with glaucoma who are aged 40 plus can have a sight test and examination by an optometrist which is paid for by the NHS, and everyone aged 60 and over is entitled to free testing. In Scotland, the NHS will pay for glaucoma examinations offered by optometrists, regardless of age.

 

  

 

 

      If you would like to request a pack of materials including bookles, balloons, banners, posters and a helpline card for National Glaucoma Awareness Week please contact marketing@iga.org.uk.

Our leaflet contains lots more information: Free Dry Eye Syndrome leaflet