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DVLA re-test?

18 February 2011, 19:47 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
I have just found the new site and here's my problem. 3 years ago I passed the DVLA test with 96%. I had to take it again 2 weeks ago and failed with a miserable 80%.The optician was very surprised at this apparent deterioration in my field vision. I was somewhat alarmed . I have been having annual check-ups at hospital now for 25 years so was a little concerned that the hospital had not drawn my attention to any deterioration. I contacted the consultant surgeon asking for information. He has written to me to say that since my trab operations 16 years ago my condition has remained stable. So if my condition is unchanged since I last took the test 3 years ago how come my score is 16% less I wonder. I am considering asking DVLA
for a re-test on the grounds that my latest test is flawed in view of the consultants evidence - perhaps through nerves, tension or lapse in concentration I performed poorly. I am not overly optimistic and wondered if anyone had experience of asking for a re-test.
23 February 2011, 12:44 PM › Go to Reply Form
Cardinal
Joined: 23/02/2011
Posts: 68
Hi Royh
I read your problem with interest.  I've just had my first bout with the DVLA - got my first 3 year licence.  However, you make a sound point about the "approved" optician field test.  I think we (the IGA?) need to start putting some pressure on the govt/DVLA to be able to get our consultants to be able to provide the required evidence for 3 year renewal.  Am I correct in thinking that only the DVLA "approved" opticians can do this particular field test? Different pieces of equipment frequently perform differently.  I was advised by my consultant that it is preferred practice for the same test machine to be used as this is more accurate in tracking over time.     

Anyone else interested in getting some pressure going?
23 February 2011, 19:34 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Actually I have a bit of history with DVLA. 10 years ago I declared my glaucoma and was sent for a test to my local hospital - I failed. Then 3 years ago I had cataract operations and lens insertions and applied for a re-test and passed. I have written to my consultant to see whether they still have the equipment to carry out DVLA tests and if so I have requested a test as a sort of second opinion. Still awaiting reply. If responsibility for assessing eyesight for driving were passed to hospitals it would cut out duplication for people like me who are assessed annually at hospital anyway. (David Cameron please note-a cost cutting opportunity!)
02 March 2011, 17:30 PM › Go to Reply Form
MikeP
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 2

Hi Cardinal

I would love to see some pressure applied to the DVLA in the hope of persuading them to take a more evidence-based approach to the effect of glaucoma instead of sticking doggedly to something the origin of which is lost in the mists of time.

 In my case I failed my third 3-year peripheral vision test some 4 years ago due to 1 missed point at the bottom of the field - actually correct as shown by retesting. However my beef is the stubborn refusal by the DVLA to allow me to go forward for an assessment practical test (an opportunity which can be granted if loss of peripheral vision is due to a stroke for example) on the grounds that "... glaucoma is progressive" despite being provided with reams of test results and statements by my surgeon showing essential stability over many, many years.

I reckon its too late to help my cause (i have been battling with the big C of the bones for last year) but I would love to see the DVLA shaken out of their complacent attitude. Go for it !!

MikeP  

09 March 2011, 18:00 PM › Go to Reply Form
Cardinal
Joined: 23/02/2011
Posts: 68
I'll start gathering some information together.  Perhaps this is something the IGA can start and help us with.  Website is a great start.  Do they have any permanent staff or is it all volunteers?
16 March 2011, 16:56 PM › Go to Reply Form
IGADavid
Joined: 16/03/2011
Posts: 1

Royh, a field of vision test is stressful at the best of times and one where your driving license is at risk is even more so. Therefore if your consultant is confident that your field of vision has not changes, then it would certainly be worthwhile asking for a re-test.

On a more general note, the Government is reviewing the vision regulations for driving at the moment (in part to bring us into line with the rest of the European Union). The visual acuity part of the test (the number plate test or how sharply you can see at a distance) will become a little less strict, but there is the possibility that the visual field requirements will become a little more onerous. The IGA has already made detailed representations to the DVLA and the Government regarding these changes, especially the changes that are under consideration for visual field requirements (not only for people with glaucoma but for all drivers - which is something of a nonsense as people who don't have glaucoma do not need to have their visual fields checked). We will continue to make representations and to work with other charities with an interest in this most important aspect of quality of life in order to have the maximum possible impact.

The IGA Chairman, Michael Miller is Chairman of the Visual Standards Advisory Group for the DVLA, but he keeps his IGA role and that as Chair of the Group completely separate. The current driving standard can be found at http://www.primary-diagnostic.co.uk/pd/EMes/dlit/2411091/index.asp and access to the minutes of the meetings of this panel can be found at http://www.dft.gov.uk/dvla/medical/medical_advisory_information/medicaladvisory_meetings.aspx

We are always interested in gathering feedback and case histories that can be used to add to our case so please continue to post (or contact us diectly). This is one of the most important things that we deal with on a daily basis and one on which we campaign both at Government level and also within the medical profession (because it is important to remind doctors that the loss of visual field that will lead to the loss of a driving license is very little when compared with the vision as a whole).

Finally, to come to Mike P's comments, the problem here is the definition of glaucoma - by definition it is a progressive condition and as such, to a legal mind, the concept of stability seems to be beyond comprehension. We have been working to encourage the concept of remission, but have yet to achieve sufficient acceptance for this to lead to the change he is looking for.

Hope all this helps

David Wright (CEO IGA)

17 March 2011, 19:48 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Thank you David. I wrote to DVLA enclosing a copy of the letter from my consultant and asked about the possibility of a re-test. I got a short reply which said that "DVLA is unable to invite you to re-apply for a Driving Licence until you are able to provide evidence of a favourable field vision test"
Well I already know this. I thought that they might give information about who should arrange for a re-test- will they arrange it presumably for a fee or is it my responsibility to find a obliging optician with the necessary equipment?. I have written back asking for clarification.
23 May 2011, 15:47 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Success !!! It has taken a little time but I appealed to DVLA (see my original posting) and arranged another test privately and submitted the results to DVLA with other information. This morning I got my 3 year licence back.This is the second time I have re-gained my licence after performing badly in the field vision test. I have now taken this test 4 times. Twice I scored in the low 80% and twice in the high 90%. I don't understand it.You get 4-5 minutes to look at 120 flashing lights and your independence depends upon the result. Anyway DVLA have dealt very fairly with me and I will not hear a word spoken against them. Now where did I put my car keys?
23 May 2011, 16:26 PM › Go to Reply Form
optimist
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 54

Great news - well done! Happy motoring.

Like you say though how is there so much difference in results, it makes you wonder is it a case of luck on the day.

Take care.

20 September 2011, 15:29 PM › Go to Reply Form
Chrisc
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 27

It’s interesting reading all these posts. I am in the position of waiting to for the results of my DVLA test. I am finding it very stressful as I am really thinking about the impact losing my license will have on my life. Usually I try to be very positive and I think I have been hiding my head in the sand up until now. I am finding the wait very stressful. If I loose my license I will have great difficulty getting to and from work. I work unsociable hours. I live in a rural location where the local bus service isn’t very reliable. I would probably need to take a taxi to the train station and back so the expense is very worrying, not to mention the cost of my train journey. I have had a look and it looks like the train would cost £28 per day and the taxi would cost £20. So it will cost me £48 per day to get to and from work. That’s £960 per month so most of my salary. One of the locations I have to work I don’t even think I will be able to get to at all. So I could lose my job over this.

I can’t understand how a person can be put in a position where they could lose everything and there not be any support mechanism in place to help you. In a previous post I said that I think the consultant should tell you when they diagnose you if you can drive or not. No one said anything at all to me about driving so I didn’t even realise that it might be a problem. As far as I can tell I can see perfectly well to drive and I thought that if I shouldn’t drive the consultant would have told me so it has been a year after diagnosis that I informed DVLA and only because a friend happened to mention that her friend had had to tell them.

Does anyone know if you get considered disabled if your sight is bad enough not to be able to drive? I know that if you are disabled you are covered by DDA although I expect that does not include glaucoma sufferer’s as we seem to get such a raw deal from everything.

L

20 September 2011, 18:51 PM › Go to Reply Form
LUCY
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 30

Hi Chris

I think it must be very stressful waiting for your results from the DVLA.  The optician told me my test was okay and that they would still allow me to drive. Did  they say that you were borderline with the test and it was down to the DVLA? The optician told me that if I was borderline they would let me take the test again to allow for nerves. I was petrified but passed okay. Nobody can tell me how often they will recall me for another test.  I think they are a law unto themselves. I am so glad that the optician told me that I had passed and the DVLA would say the same when they saw the results

I hope that they let you know soon. I think waiting must be terrible.

Let us know how you get on.

Lucy

20 September 2011, 22:23 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Chris - see my earlier posts.I learned a valuable lesson. Firstly I  I didn't wait for DVLA to re-call me.I wrote to them and got a reply that said they could only return my licence as a result of a satisfactory test result. So I arranged for a re-test privately and paid about £15. The optician who obviously carries out tests for DVLA had never come across this approach before and was very surprised. I got a high score and obtained all the forms I needed. I downloaded the DVLA form which is available on the internet (thats the one they send to you to make certain declarations). I also got the form from the Post Office to apply for a license and sent them all off together with the test result from the optician. Within 5 days my license arrived .  So (a) stop worrying there is nothing you can do at the moment (b) if you fail that is not necessarily the end. If I had failed a second time I would have paid for another re-test because I think the test itself can be affected by many things. (c) I saw somewhere that the failure rate is as low as 10 in 100. So for the moment relax-don't worry about things that might not happen. Oh and the very best of luck-let us know how you get on.
21 September 2011, 10:53 AM › Go to Reply Form
Chrisc
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 27
Dear Lucy and Royh, thanks for your replies. I will try not to worry particularly as it probably will put my pressures up ;)
When I went for my test they told me that I would just have the test and then be able to go because I had just recently had a full eye test and a change of glasses. However after the test they told me the optician wanted to see me. She then did an eye exam and asked me if I wore my glasses to drive. I was with her for about ten minutes and she wouldn't say if I would pass or not. From the moment I left I got a bad feeling. Also yesterday my boss told me she was going to send me to our occupational health people at work. She said she was thinking it might be better if I was re deployed into another job or pensioned off. I am 49 have been a librarian all my working life and I feel devastated. Sorry, feeling sorry for myself now. I hope I do pass the test because then at least I can use it to prove I can see well enough to do my job.
Thanks again for your best wishes, I won't give up if I fail but at the moment feel like everything is against me.
I will let you know when I get the results.
Best wishes,
Christine
p.s. it's nice to know there are people who care :)
21 September 2011, 11:41 AM › Go to Reply Form
Bailey
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 223

Hi Chris,

Your boss has got a bl***y cheek!  She can't do that, if you think you can see well enough to do your job, then you can carry on, if not, she should find you another job for the same wages.  It's about time the Human Rights worked for people like us isn't it!  Don't worry about feeling down, we all have those days!  I was rambling on to my cat this morning before I went to work, he's the only one who listens!  My mum's just been on the phone to me, feeling sorry for herself because my brother's on holiday & she wanted me to go round this weekend (I do see her a lot when I'm not at work anyway) as she's lonely (thankfully she's in good health), she's made me feel quite guilty because I'm actually going out for a meal with my daughters (she won't come) - anyway, doesn't matter how much I tell her about me & what I'll have to face if I live to her age, she just feels sorry for herself all the time - grrrr!  Actually, I wanted to make you feel better, but that probably hasn't helped much!!

On a happier note my puss-cat is a beautiful cream British Shorthair (given to me!)  He lays on me in the morning & purrs & listens to all my woes, hehe.

I care about you & everyone else on here.

Bailey x

 

 

21 September 2011, 11:55 AM › Go to Reply Form
optimist
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 54

Hi Chris.

Sorry Chris I'm not all that good with words but just wanted you to know that there is someone else here listening to what you are saying and hoping things work out well for you.

I can understand the panic you must be in and hope the results come through soon. I can't understand why your boss is saying those things - surely if you are doing your job fine then there should be no problem - why can't people be more understanding and realise what an impact their actions can have.

Take care.

21 September 2011, 12:02 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Chris - just another thought- I was first failed by DVLA some 13 years ago and lost my license for 7 years. However despite regular opticians visits it was a nurse who told me I had cataracts in each eye. When these were corrected I passed the DVLA test. So ask whether you have cataracts. Sounds silly but no-one told me and I was also having annual checkups at hospital and at the opticians, The cataracts didn't just develop overnight so something was wrong in my communications with these people.
21 September 2011, 16:36 PM › Go to Reply Form
Bailey
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 223

Hi Royh,

That's really negligent of your specialist and opticians. What's the symptoms of cataracts? Does the eye look opaque when you look in the mirror?

Bailey x

23 September 2011, 12:59 PM › Go to Reply Form
Chrisc
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 27

Thank you everyone. I feel a bit better now. Still haven't heard yet though. I get a lot of problems with fuzzy light in my eyes. i told my consultant and he just shrugged and said I had bad glaucoma. Hum. But now I am thinking that it could be cataracts so will ask next time. I am so pleased you have an understanding cat Bailey. I have got three and they all ignore me. They love my husband though. I have got two dogs as well and they seem to be a bit more understanding although my KCS tried to drag me under a lorry the other day.

Not sure where we stand when it comes to work. Are we disabled and covered by the DDA. I must admit there are some areas of my work I have trouble with but generally I can do what I need to do.

 

Best wishes, and thanks again  X

23 September 2011, 18:29 PM › Go to Reply Form
Lavengro
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 135

Hello, My experience of my first DVL visual field test is as follows, optician did three tests then said I was borderline, he then suggested I did the test without my glass's the result was 100% pass. Maybe the frames were making the difference. Has anyone seen the new stem cell treatment for potential blindness, tests are now being trialed at Moorfields. I do'nt think it is for glaucoma but there may be some hope for us all in the future.

Good Luck everyone. Lavengro.

23 September 2011, 23:11 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Lavengro - yes the general advice is to take the test without your glasses if you are shortsighted - even if you wear glasses to drive.
Bailey - cataracts seem to cloud your vision a little without your realising it. I certainly noticed the difference after the operation - the sky was bluer, the grass greener etc. and I found that I could recognise people who were on the other side of the road when previously I couldn't. Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. They are also painless so unless they are picked up by the optician you may not know you have them but you may notice your vision getting worse and objects seem fuzzy or cloudy. Colours may seem a little faded or washed out but (in my case) this seemed to have happened very gradually because I didn't fully realise until after the op. I actually was amazed at how blue the flame was when I lit the gas ring on the cooker!!
18 October 2011, 12:27 PM › Go to Reply Form
Chrisc
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 27
Hello Royh, just thought I'd let you know that I heard back from DVLA and they said I can continue to drive until my doctor say's I can't. So that is a bit of a relief for me and just as well because the letter was sitting on my doorstep after a lovely week driving in North Devon. I was a little confused because I didn't get the okay to drive for 6 months, 2 years or so like other people seem to get. So I asked the lovely private consultant I saw yesterday (that I can't afford to see again) and he did another DVLA test and explained that I am on the verge of losing enough sight to stop me driving but that when that happens I will qualify for a CVI which will help me. He said that if I can't see well enough to drive then I won't be able to continue with the work I do. So I am on a bit of a knife edge still but at least I know there will be some sort of a safety net and I don't have to worry right at this minute.

18 October 2011, 20:47 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
I have been  wondering about you Chris. So the news isn't as bad as it could have been - well done on that. Hopefully your sight will not deteriorate any more - I certainly hope not .In a way those of us who passed the DVLA test are also on a knife edge of sorts because we will have to re-take it sometime in the future so I know how you feel! Try not to worry about the future and enjoy your reprieve which I hope is permanent.
23 October 2011, 12:16 PM › Go to Reply Form
Chrisc
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 27
Hello Royh, thank you for your support. I have just been reading the information about eyesight and the DVLA on the Moorfield's website and it say's that you must not drive until the DVLA say you can do. It's seems very logical but actually I didn't know this so I carried on driving - I have to drive to get to work - I did wonder about this but I am sure that it wasn't made clear on this website before. I was looking to try and find out and didn't see anything from anywhere that said you couldn't drive...
Unless they just changed it.

Best regards,
Chris
24 October 2011, 21:19 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Hi Chris. When I first told DVLA that I had glaucoma 15 years ago I used the telephone. I was told to stop driving until a .field test could be arranged and the results assessed. However when my re-test was due I was told that I could continue driving until the results were known. Just the reverse. I think if you ask the question formally you may be told to stop driving. So far no-one has given you that advice. I suppose it's up to you to decide the next step. Maybe it's a different rule in your case..I know what I would do.
01 November 2011, 14:05 PM › Go to Reply Form
Chrisc
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 27

Hi Royh, it's so confusing isn't it. I just carried on driving in blissful ignorance. The whole thing is stupid really. Because I can't see in the dark, I get fixated on the snow drops if it snows (I went to my local shop just around the corner from where I live, and got caught in a blizzard last year and basically completely lost my bearings. I had to call my husband to come and rescue me because I couldn't see at all). Also fog is a nightmare and twilight is difficult. On the rare occasions where it is actually sunny, bright and clear I can actually see quite well. Most of the time I drive in the previous conditions. Not to mention when I have been working all day on the computer, am growing a migraine and all I see are aura's around everything! They don't ask you or check for those things. I will say one thing though, I would never drive if I really felt I couldn't and I am a very careful driver. Slow lane 50 miles per hour that's me.

 

02 November 2011, 18:58 PM › Go to Reply Form
itsmyblindspot
Joined: 02/11/2011
Posts: 1

Chrisc, im really interested in your response above as im affected by fog, snow, twilight and general 'grey' days but am unsure as to how my eys are affected like this.  I know glaucoma affects your ability to see when contrast is low.  When i asked in the clinic the doctor said..."oh strange" i couldnt believe his response!! Strange maybe but its a nightmare when you have to drive for several hours everyday. Do you know why this happens? Is it normal for glaucoma sufferers? Can i do anything to help myself?

 

03 November 2011, 10:41 AM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
You are wise to drive within your comfort zone Chris. I have none of those problems but do find car headlights very dazzling at night so I tend to keep off the road when it is dark.
05 November 2011, 15:43 PM › Go to Reply Form
Chrisc
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 27

itsmyblindspot  - hi your user name makes me laugh. Yes I have terrible trouble with light affecting my eyes. I explained this to the onsultant and he shrugged and said it was my glaucoma. However when i saw a specialist at Moorefield's he said he didn't know what that was and asked me to explain further. I said that I often see the shape of an object to the left or right of my vision echoed in my central vision but in white. I get flashing lights and see auras around things. Once I saw a lovely bright green, twinkling aura around someone's shoulders. he was mystified too but as I suffer a lot with migraine he put it down to that. I am not convinced though. I think the flashing lights occur when the cells in my optic nerve die off. I used to get loads before the sight in my left eye went. I never see them in that eye with what's left of my vision now but have started to get them in my right eye and coincidently I am starting to lose sight in that eye too. As far as the weather conditions go I find falling snow the worst. I get fixated, my eyes hurt and I start to get a headache and feel sick. (I must admit I did panic when this happened which probably didn't help) but I couldn't even see the floor. When I got home I had to lay down and close my eyes. Fog is just terrible.

Do you suffer with migraine? It helps a bit if you are strict about taking your medication if you do. If not then I don't know what to do really. If we tell our doctor's and consultants and they shrug it's not much help. I have to drive for between 5 and 7 hours a day just to get to and from work and I just try and drive very safely, not to fast and as my Zulu driving instructor told me when I was learning to drive 39 years ago. "Driving is like life, look ahead and try and work out what the idiots are doing and stay as far away from them as you can."

09 February 2012, 0:12 AM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
I have just joined this site in the hope I can correspond with people who like myself have the worrying prospect of a DVLA eye test My case is simple ( I think) I was told 18 months ago that I had glucoma and I was advised by the specialist at the hospital not to drive ? I thought this strange as I had not had any trouble driving (o I am a HGV class two driver ) I have been driving for 42 years and never had an accident ,! I started taking eye drops, and have glasses for driving still no problem, since I was told I had Gluecoma I have driven my Hgv vehicle for 37,000 miles. In May last year I drove across America from Chicago to San Francisco via LAs Vegas and Los Angeles , (Route 66) total mileage 3774 miles Plus in my car I have done 5.000 miles all since I was told I have Gluecoma, after being put under pressure I have relented and informed the Dvla. And I am waiting for there reply. How long that takes god mows ! A cole of points I would like to make is this I showed the specialist the at the hospital the forms I was sending to the Dvla and he could not confirm if I met the criteria required ? Also I asked him why is it when I look straight ahead I have no problems seing anything even looking side to side And you will love this He said my brain was kidding me what iw as seing I could not really see so god knows who put all those objects before my eyes ? And finally a couple of years ago a top specialist at the LIverpool Royal St Pauls eye hospital did a survey of people with Gluecoma and made a statement that The field vision test was unfair because no ever has to drive to the standards that the test involves I.e chin on a pad looking at little lights. I would like to chat to people about this as its been a lonely 18 months not having to talk to anyone about my problem and at 62 the thought of losing my job because of beurocrats is not helping Mike
09 February 2012, 0:15 AM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
I love my logo,picture as Scuba DIving is my hobby
09 February 2012, 0:31 AM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Does anyone no of anywhere in Liverpool where I could pay to have an eye test that meets the Dvla standard ?
09 February 2012, 11:29 AM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Hello Similans. People on this Site will appreciate how you feel - we have all been at your stage. Firstly dont worry in advance - when it comes to your DVLA test you may well pass - I think the pass rate is quite high. Secondly the DVLA will write to you and tell you who your nearest DVLA approved optician is and tell you to make an appointment. They will pay for the test. Don\'t therefore pay for a private test just yet. Thirdly like you I delayed notifying DVLA because of worries about my job .The reality is that unless you have approval to drive, your insurance is worthless and you would automatically be held liable if involved in an accident.  I felt relieved when I finally notified DVLA because it was a weight of my mind. In my dealings with DVLA I have found them to be fair and ressonable so don\'t think they will be out to get you. Fingers crossed for you - do let us know how you get on.
09 February 2012, 15:38 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Thanks Royh I do feel I need someone to talk to as I feel as thou my life has been put on hold it is creating real problems at home not being able to plan anything also the financial implications . Does informing the Dvla clear you regarding insurance ,because you have not technically been stopped from driving . Thanks again for replying Similans (Mike)
09 February 2012, 17:08 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Is there anybody out there with glucoma effected by fluorescent lights or is it just me I find walking around supermarkets with there bright lights makes me feel sick or is just a state of mind.
09 February 2012, 18:05 PM › Go to Reply Form
Bailey
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 223
Hi Similan,
Firstly don\'t worry about your DVLA test, it\'s easy-peasy compared to the field tests we have at the consultants. Secondly, yes, I am very effected by flourescent lights as well, in fact although I was only diagnosed 2 yrs ago with glaucoma, I left a job about 12 yrs ago because the lights gave me migraine & hurt my eyes.
10 February 2012, 12:52 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Thanks bailey some comfort in what you have said the lights and headaches are beginning to piece together. Can you give me an idea what to expect on the Dvla test ? Do you use both eyes together ? Do wear your own glasses I think that the time waiting in the waiting room before the test has an adverse effect because by the time I get called in I feel terrible with the fluorescent lights so get of to a bad start from the word go.
13 February 2012, 18:05 PM › Go to Reply Form
Royh
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 56
Similans - yes you use both eyes and press a buzzer when you see a flashing light. The test takes about 41/2 minutes. Because I am shortsighted my optician advised me to take the test without glasses even though I drive with glasses. If you are shortsighted it is worth checking with the optician before you take the test.
14 February 2012, 18:09 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Well thanks Roth for your reply my forms arrived today from the DVLA I have to contact St Pauls eye hospital at the LIverpool Royal Hospital in LIverpool funny really that is where I go for my check ups . When you mentioned your short sighted made me think. I where variofocals bottom part of my glasses for reading , top part for long distance driving which has me thinking when your looking straight ahead with your glasses on I\'m looking at the distance area but the screen you actually look at is very close maybe that is where I have been going wrong or am I just clutching at straws ?
14 February 2012, 18:16 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
If anyone has any advice to help me on my field vision test please tell me thanks,
15 February 2012, 0:16 AM › Go to Reply Form
Bailey
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 223
Hi, don\'t worry at all, it really is simple. You don\'t have to go where they send you either, you can request to go to your nearest optician who does the test.
21 February 2012, 12:22 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Well now have my date for my field vision test 11.30 29 /02/2012 so one week to worry :-( Just think my my whole life could change next week.
21 February 2012, 12:27 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Well now have my date for my field vision test 11.30 29 /02/2012 so one week to worry :-( Just think my my whole life could change next week.
21 February 2012, 12:30 PM › Go to Reply Form
Similans
Joined: 08/02/2012
Posts: 16
Well now have my date for my field vision test 11.30 29 /02/2012 so one week to worry :-( Just think my my whole life could change next week.
17 July 2012, 18:47 PM › Go to Reply Form
brianh
Joined: 17/07/2012
Posts: 3
i missed 11 points on the extreme left which is my weaker eye will i fail?
17 October 2012, 11:32 AM › Go to Reply Form
mikecahill
Joined: 17/10/2012
Posts: 2

At a recent consultation with my specialist I asked 'with my peripheral vision problem why do I not trip up and bump into things'. His reply was that the eye/brain combination compensates for for missing parts of the vision field. Because the eye is always scanning the brain fills in the missing bits after various scans. When driving the same process occurs - looking forward, left and right, using wing and rearview mirrors, etc- provides the complete picture.

The DVLA test does not reflect this. It tests the eye - not the eye/brain combination.

Is/are there any pressure group(s) underway that is seeking a more representative DVLA eye test ? 

17 October 2012, 12:33 PM › Go to Reply Form
Bailey
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 223

Hi,

Well, the brain does fill in, but only in a general way, i.e. if you're looking at a vast green field, your eyes will naturally assume ALL the field is green, even if in reality there might be a small animal or rock in the part of the green field which is sitting in your blank part of your vision & replaced with more green field by your eye/brain connection.  I'm probably not explaining this very well, but I had a problem playing tennis where my eyes were assuming I was seeing more court, but I was continually losing sight of the ball, maybe where it bounced through my 'blank' spaces which were 'painted in' by my brain to see more court or sky!  So if you think about it in the context of driving, we may THINK we can see all of the gravel coloured road but in fact there may be something or someone passing into our blank parts of our vision which we are not immediately aware of until it's too late.

 

That's my theory why these type of DVLC tests are important, they need to know the extent of our black holes.  Even though I know I may lose my licence next year, I would hate to knock down someone that I didn't immediately see.

 

p.s. Reading that back, I hope you understand all that, cos I sure don't!

 

Bailey

17 October 2012, 14:29 PM › Go to Reply Form
mikecahill
Joined: 17/10/2012
Posts: 2

Hello

I believe the 'fill-in' is achieved by the eyes/head moving and using several images to provide the picture. The brain uses information from more than one image to determine what is in the field of view. I don't think it works like the typical CCD Image Enhancement you describe.

The real question that I am trying to understand is how good the current test is in terms of preventing accidents whilst allowing reasonably safe people to continue to drive. As we have seen in other areas, our Health and Safety Culture has generated impractical compromises

After all, if we want to be absolutely safe then, perhaps, no-one should drive !!

18 October 2012, 14:15 PM › Go to Reply Form
Bailey
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 223
Hi,
Yes I see what you're saying, the last time I had the the DVLC peripheral test I found it way easier than the one I have at the opticians, & my eyes weren't particularly good then, so personally I don't find it too harsh.  I may change my mind when they take my licence away & I can no longer take my elderly mum shopping, I drive less and less these days though anyway.  Maybe it's just hard to make the test an exact science, my mum's neighbour is 83, has only one eye (lost in an accident when he was young) wears glasses, & he still regularly drives.
10 November 2012, 18:39 PM › Go to Reply Form
Stephen
Joined: 11/05/2012
Posts: 61
Can someone help with a comment made by (Chrisc) on the 18 October about 20 posts up, it says that the doctor told that when he/she was no longer able to drive due to sight he/she would qualify for a certificate of visual impairment. Does anyone know if this is true I would have thought that if you were close to getting a cvi certificate that your sight would be that poor that you should almost definitly not be driving.......
12 November 2012, 12:10 PM › Go to Reply Form
Sightline
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 121

Hello Stephen,

Losing your Driving Licence does not necessarily mean that the person will be entitled to being classed as partially sighted. It depends on the amount of vision they have lost and it would be up to their consultant to make the decision whether the patient has lost enough sight to be registered partially sighted.

As you say if the persons sight is that effected they shouldn't be driving and should have been advised by their consultant to stop driving.

Sightline

21 November 2012, 17:47 PM › Go to Reply Form
willymandy
Joined: 06/11/2012
Posts: 8
Hi it's great to have this forum-I'm 42 and was diagnosed with Early primary open angle glaucoma about 6 weeks ago. My father(76) also has glaucoma and I have been having annual hospital check ups over the last 4 years as my pressures are high. I now use eye drops once a day in each eye and have been prescribed glasses for driving and watching TV(slight prescription). I was advised to let the DVLA know, which I did and was advised by the DVLA to attend a DVLA optician to take a test. Although I had a routine eye test 6 weeks ago and had been to the hospital 2 days after this!? My consultant said to me you will still be driving when you are 70 take these drops and come back in 6 months? However I missed 2 lights(very stressed and mind wandered for a second) on the DVLA visual fields test and now I have been told by the DVLA that they want to withdraw my current licence and it will be replaced by a 3 year one? It mentions I can appeal and may seek independent legal advice?
I feel devastated, has anyone appealed and how do you do this . I am going to speak to my consultant tomorrow as i can't wait till April for my next appointment . My father has never been told to notify the DVLA although as he's over 70 he does have a test every 3 years like every over 70 year old. Is notifying the DVLA a new ruling in the last 6 years?
Any advice on appealing-either way it says I need to sign declaration and send off my present licence.
I feel so depressed that every 3 years I stand to loose my licence when other drivers don't even need to have their eyes tested by law!!


I
21 November 2012, 19:19 PM › Go to Reply Form
Stephen
Joined: 11/05/2012
Posts: 61
Hello willmandy I don't think it is the fact you missed 2 dots is why you now have a 3 year licence even if you did not miss any dots now they know you have glucoma 3 years is the max length of time they would issue with a licence, it is usualy either 1 year or 3 as they want to make sure your sight does not get worse over time. Like you this is the same problem I have and it's is causing me a lot of worry as I drive a van as part of my job and also my wife has heart failure and has to attend various hospitals including Manchester and Liverpool being the main ones this is quite a drive from mid Wales, because of my wife's condition she has already been stopped from driving by her doctor and I'm so worried I will be next, also I really need a new car and it is now so hard to decide because you never know when they will take your licence away, like you I'm only young at 34 and several months ago prescribed glasses slight prescription just for driving etc, I hope you don't mind me asking but have they told you have any damage to your optic nerve from the high pressure, mine was 34 when I first found out I had glucoma and had started to damage the nerve. hopefully as your doctor says you will still be driving for many more years....
21 November 2012, 19:33 PM › Go to Reply Form
Stephen
Joined: 11/05/2012
Posts: 61
Willmandy, also I don't think it would be worth appealing unless they take away your licence as I can't see dvla changeing there mind, as I say 3 years is normally the max licence you will now get as many people only get 1 year, how did you find the test did you use both eyes at the same time and did you wear your glasses....
22 November 2012, 11:58 AM › Go to Reply Form
willymandy
Joined: 06/11/2012
Posts: 8
Hi Stephen thank you for your reply. When i went for my opticians annual check up my pressures were 30 and 26 she advised me to go to the hospital within 7 days and 2 days later they were 24 and 25. However i think there is some damage to the optic nerve in my right eye- in the letter to my doctor it states in the right eye i have a visible cribriform plate? Whatever that might be! 
I have a phobia of eyes and find it very difficult to concentrate(even stay concious sometimes!) when having my eyes examined,because of this I can't ask questions and ask them not to mention any part of my eye or what they are doing? i know it is pathetic but this is why the thought of being tested every 3 years stresses me even more. Today i have contacted DVLA who said i can pay for another retest of the visual fields and appeal to keep a lifetime licence- but I'm not going to hold my breath. However I'm having a retest on Saturday to prove to myself that my vision is ok as mentally this condition is effecting me and my confidence. I'm also going to speak to my consultant today to find out my optical damage so far and if i do indeed have the condition in both eyes- I presume I do as I put drops in both and he told me to advise the DVLA?
once again thank you for your reply and i wish you many more years of safe driving.

22 November 2012, 13:10 PM › Go to Reply Form
willymandy
Joined: 06/11/2012
Posts: 8
Hi, I have just spoken to my Ophthalmologist who has confirmed I do have the condition in both eyes and advised what you suspected Stephen that a visual fields test with no lights missed would still result in a 3 year short period licence. He again re assured me that I will pass it every 3 years and be issued with another licence-if only I could get that in writing!?
Cancelled my test on Saturday now(might need that 20 for bus fare in the future!) and reluctantly with post my lifetime licence back to DVLA! 
During the next 3 years will concentrate on getting to grips with my eye phobia! 
Feeling a little bit better-just hate towing the line! 

22 November 2012, 16:50 PM › Go to Reply Form
Stephen
Joined: 11/05/2012
Posts: 61
@WILLMANDY It does sound as if you have caught it very early especialy as you were having annual check ups, I was not having anual check ups and suspect my pressures had been rising a few years earlier and that is now what has caused the damage I have to my optic nerves as i had high pressures for to long, march this year and that was my first ever optician visit and I only went then because I new something was wrong, I can only assume the damage is not to bad to my nerve's as I can still see clear and on a bright day can still read a number plate from 20 metres, I'm guessing im a similar prescription to yours just for driving etc. It does sound as if you will have no problems passing future field test for the dvla as you said yourself if your mind did not wonder you would not have missed any of the lights, another plus for yourself is your doctor has said you will be still driving when you are 70 to me that sounds promising and now your pressures are down you should have no further problems......
30 November 2012, 11:09 AM › Go to Reply Form
Cardinal
Joined: 23/02/2011
Posts: 68

Hi Willymandy

I know just how you're feeling.  It happened to me around 20 months ago.  So, I have just over a year left on my 3 year licence.   I wish I hadn't told the DVLA in the first place!.  However, I'm now getting stressed already and I've got over a year to go before my next test.  It really isn't fair they create all this stress by putting people  (almos)t automaically on a 3 year licence.  There must be a fairer system than this, but I guess it takes very active pressure groups to get things changed.   I think this is something the Association should champion for members. 

 

 

 

 

 

I know

30 November 2012, 12:23 PM › Go to Reply Form
Sightline
Joined: 01/01/2011
Posts: 121

When someone has a visual impairment in both eyes the person(s) will be asked to resit a test every three years. If they are borderline they may be asked to resit every 12 months.

If anyone diagnosed with glaucoma in both eyes fails to contact the DVLA they run the risk of getting a Thousand Pound fine and also the chance of having their licence revoked.

We speak to many patients who say that they are capable of driving and indeed they normally are but it is also important to follow the correct procedures.

We understand that the thought of losing ones licence can be a daunting prospect but remember if your glaucoma is caught in the early stages there is a very good chance that you will retain your licence. Safety in driving is paramount as we are sure you agree.The last thing any of you would want would be to put yourself of anyone else in danger. Unfortunately there are too many people with glaucoma who have not advised the DVLA and been involved in fatalities and the victims are usually predestrians and not the driver.

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